Exercise · reading Marcus Bleasdale

Comments on reading Marcus Bleasdale

Short interview with Bleadsdale:

https://vimeo.com/20980346

Bleasdale is an impressive figure in that he left behind a profitable and comfortable lifestyle for what can only perhaps be described as for compassionate purposes. Being a banker, he turned into a photojournalist and began work in the conflict zones of the Congo.

Over twelve years he covered the conflict in the Congo region with the aim of brining it to the publics attention in order to take action. In an interview with Bleasdale he is asked if he feels that anything has changed in the situation since he began photographing the region. “I was the only photographer there when I started…” (Bleasdale, 2011) [1] and with him evidently only one journalist. Now there are many more.

Beasdale is a ‘concerned photographer’. This altruistic side to photography is normally associated with the genre of photojournalism and tends to not be financially oriented but rather driven by other forces that are provoked by desire to see change.

The question that comes to my mind is: How far does photojournalism go to creating social change when we live in a climate of increasingly politicised agendas? Is photography still effective in creating change?


references

  1. Bleasdale, M. (2011) [interview online by photographer: Ljubljana, Slovenia] https://vimeo.com/20980346 [accessed December, 2019]

 

 

 

 

Published by Truevisionphotography

I'm a student photographer studying through the OCA a UK based arts university. I'm in the foundation year of my studies and enjoying it immensely. I'm also a yoga teacher and co-founder of Bodhiyoga a buddhism based yoga teacher training program that runs in the UK and Spain each year. As a photographer I'm interested in all forms of fine art. I find the arts really important in my life. I love nature and aim to be in the outdoors as much as I can. Generally I think that all the different strands of my life are flowing to towards self development in the greatest sense of the term. The arts, buddhist practice yoga and meditation are all tools to that end. I feel committed to communication the these values in the world both through the visual arts as well as teaching.

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